A great teaching article and video about the difference between - to have your hair cut or to cut your hair. From the English as a second language blog @kimgriffithsenglish

Have you cut your hair or have you had your hair cut?

Today’s article is about
the difference between:  Have you cut your hair? and Have you had your hair cut? talking about services you have done for you. a quiz on the used structure the answers to last week’s crossword
The more difficult vocabulary is identified with an asterisk * and a definition is in brackets ( ).

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How to describe a bad person, bad character Adjectives, idiom and more. from the English as a second language teaching blog - @kimgriffithsenglish

How to describe a bad person.

Last week, I told you some adjectives and an idiom about good characteristics of a person’s personality. So this week it is the turn of the negative qualities. Which politician do you think I have included as an example of one of the adjectives? And which adjective? Read on (continue reading) to find out. An idiom, 6 adjectives, study, pronunciation and spelling tip, recommended reading, Adjectives Crossword

How to describe a good person's character. From the English teaching blog - KimGriffithsEnglish,the place to improve, practice and maintain your English as a second language.

How to describe a good person.

This is all about a person’s character. A good character. pronunciation of character, to be the salt of the earth, to be level headed, to take responsibility for your actions, to be honest, to be open-minded, to be kind, My vídeo explanation

Valentines Day blog, Kim griffiths Englishs.com

Valentine’s Day 2019

For this week’s theme I am using Valentine’s Day. But don’t worry it isn’t too soppy* or over sweet.
A beautiful literary declaration of love, 3 romantic themed phrases with 1 preposition, 2 Idioms love – 1 good and 1 bad, My Valentine’s Challenge 2019, A Quick quiz, The answers to last week’s quiz.

Talking about snow in 4 categories with KimGriffithsEnglish.com, the blog to learn English as a second language.

How to talk about snow

Imagine you are reading an article, story or exam reading paper and the main character is walking home, watching their feet kicking the  *____ as they walked, and listening to the sound it made.  If we put *tightly packed snow, we would visualise white thick snow and the sound would be a crunching noise. But if we insert *slush we would visualise an almost grey, melting wet unpleasant snow and the watery sloshing sound. The overall effect would be different. Now we see that using a more defined word than snow can change our comprehension and if you don’t know those words you can miss a lot.