The Duke was Dead! 10 phrasal verbs story.

10 phrasal verbs taught in a Sherlock Holmes story which I invented. I love teaching English as a second language. My teaching blog is www.kimgriffithsenglish.

 

  1. What’s the easiest way to learn phrasal verbs?
  2. Useful vocabulary for the story.
  3. The Duke was dead! Sherlock Holmes story Video.
  4. The story written down to save and review the phrasal verbs later.
  5. The 10 phrasal verbs and their synonyms.
  6. Your turn to practice.

 

What is the easiest way to learn phrasal verbs?

Everybody has methods which work best for themselves. Every teacher has an opinion. My opinion is what I’ll tell you about.  I think putting phrasal verbs in a context is the best way to teach them and I believe presenting them in a memorable story or situation is, at least in my experience, the easiest way for students to learn them.

So, let’s get down to some phrasal verbs! Watch my video and read the story to discover the meaning of the phrasal verb ‘get down to’ 😉 and nine more!

 

Useful vocabulary for the story

  • Duke = a man who is a high member of the aristocracy, usually with connections to the Royal family and queen.
  • Duchess = the wife of a Duke.
  • Widow = the wife of a man who has died.
  • Servant = someone who works in the house of another person full time, this is an old fashioned job.
  • Butler = the most powerful man-servant in a house.
  • to resign = to say officially that you don’t want to work somewhere any more.
  • resignation = the adjective of to resign.

 

The Duke was Dead! A Sherlock Holmes story invented by KimGriffithsEnglish

Watch the video. I have put correct subtitles in case you need them – they are listed as subtitles or captions.

10 phrasal verbs taught in a Sherlock Holmes story which I invented. I love teaching English as a second language. My teaching blog is www.kimgriffithsenglish.

Click here to watch the video on Youtube.

 

The story written down to save and review the phrasal verbs later

 

Kim Griffiths English 10 phrasal verb Sherlock Holmes story. From the English teaching blog www.kimgriffithsenglish.

 

Here are the phrasal verbs and their synonyms!

The asterisk * shows where we can put the object if it needs one.

  1.  to turn up = arrive/appear.
  2.  to carry out * = to do a procedure. )
  3.  to get * across = to communicate/ express.
  4.  to hand in * = to officially give something to someone.
  5.  to pick * up * = to collect someone and take them somewhere.
  6.  to get down to * = to start (usually for work and things you need to do).
  7.  to stay on = to remain/stay in a place.
  8.  to go over * = to review something.
  9.  to work * out * = to realise/understand/calculate something.
  10.  to keep up with * = to be as fast and at the same speed/rhythm mentally or physically as something or someone.

 

Your turn to practice using them.

Put the correct phrasal verbs in the gaps in the correct verb tense.

 

  1. Remember to ____ ____ your homework to the teacher.
  2. The taxi will ____ us ____ at 6 and take us to the theatre.
  3. I ____ ____ at the academy some evenings to correct student’s homework.
  4. I can ____ ____ ____ John when we go running. I’m a fast runner!
  5. Before you leave, please ____ ____ your exams for spelling mistakes.
  6. Why do I leave it so late to ____ ____ ____ cleaning the house on Sundays?
  7. You’re late again! Yesterday you ____ ____ 20 minutes late for class.
  8. I love ____ ____ science experiments at school.
  9. I can’t ____ ____ the percentage without a calculator.
  10. I couldn’t ____ my feelings ____. He still doesn’t know I love him!

 

I’ll put the answers in next Sunday’s blog.  So don’t lose your answers. Subscribe so you don’t miss it!

Have a great week!

Which is your favourite Sherlock Holmes book, movie or story? Tell me in the comments.

Hugs,

Kim

 

 

 

 



 

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About Kim Griffiths

I'm interested in kindness, creativity, positivity and learning new things. I teach English, write about English, sing jazz, paint and make things.

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